Door spacers

Started by Petrus, August 30, 2022, 11:17

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Gibla

Ps went out this evening with an unmodified in any way (minus any upper strut brace) Fl on ~45k miles with a 15-month-old Dev 'bar of soap' installation - roof down

Zero detectable scuttle shake, no rattles whatsoever ......perfection

but in the act of going out in that car I had to shift another car, the bloody doors were stuck shut after this morning's re-installation of the Dev units ......will take 'em off asap + thin them down
stock 2001 Dark Green MR-S (6R4)
stock 2004 Black - repurchased from guy who bought yellow 'un
stock 2000 Light Green(Cape Green)

1979scotte

Quote from: Gibla on August 31, 2022, 21:09SDS prolly better

SdS is already taken for hammer drills.
#justsayin 😂
First they came for the socialists, and I did not speak out—because I was not a socialist.
Then they came for the Jews, and I did not speak out—because I was not a Jew.
Then they came for me—and there was no one left to speak for me.

Free Ukraine 🇺🇦

Dev

Quote from: Gibla on August 31, 2022, 21:16Ps went out this evening with an unmodified in any way (minus any upper strut brace) Fl on ~45k miles with a 15-month-old Dev 'bar of soap' installation - roof down

Zero detectable scuttle shake, no rattles whatsoever ......perfection

but in the act of going out in that car I had to shift another car, the bloody doors were stuck shut after this morning's re-installation of the Dev units ......will take 'em off asap + thin them down

Are you using any Carnauba paste wax with the install. It is needed when they are installed otherwise the doors will be tight and hard to open. It makes a very big difference. After some time they will reconfirm to the door and it will not be required depending on how tight they are to begin with. The material I use has the ability to adjust over time as it compresses. In your case if you haven't use them in a long time they will expand back to its original shape.



 



Gibla

Quote from: Dev on August 31, 2022, 21:27Are you using any Carnauba paste wax with the install. It is needed when they are installed otherwise the doors will be tight and hard to open. It makes a very big difference. After some time they will reconfirm to the door and it will not be required depending on how tight they are to begin with. The material I use has the ability to adjust over time as it compresses. In your case if you haven't use them in a long time they will expand back to its original shape.

Cheers Dev  :)
I will take the advice + do as you suggest


 



stock 2001 Dark Green MR-S (6R4)
stock 2004 Black - repurchased from guy who bought yellow 'un
stock 2000 Light Green(Cape Green)

Dev

#29
Just a few corrections. The door bushings I manufacture are made of Alloy 910 not Delrin. I initially wanted to have them made of Delrin like what is offered in the Mazda community but it was not possible due to the increased costs. I substituted for a newer printer material that is very strong but also flexible because that area takes a beating that cracked my prototypes made of solid ABS. It turns out that the Mazda community found out that Delrin was not a good choice and have switched to carbon fiber reinforced nylon long after my bushings were manufactured. In my opinion I believe Alloy 910 is the better material because its stiff but it also yields and comes back to its original shape and will confirm over time with a break in period of about six months to a year if they are under constant tension.
  This material has the ability to be sanded to fit or you can add a shim to tighten them up however over subsequent generations of printing I finally got the right size where in 90% of cases adjustment is not necessary. The installation is easy and requires no hardware and can be removed easily if you don't like them.


Although I could have made a more elaborate set up my goal was to keep costs low and installation simple for the most bang for the buck and volume of sales. That goal was achieved long ago. It is nice to see a new more refined option and I wish them the best of luck.

Microgerry

Quote from: Dev on August 31, 2022, 22:07Just a few corrections. The door bushings I manufacture are made of Alloy 910 not Delrin. I initially wanted to have them made of Delrin like what is offered in the Mazda community but it was not possible due to the increased costs. I substituted for a newer printer material that is very strong but also flexible because that area takes a beating that cracked my prototypes made of solid ABS. It turns out that the Mazda community found out that Delrin was not a good choice and have switched to carbon fiber reinforced nylon long after my bushings were manufactured. In my opinion I believe Alloy 910 is the better material because its stiff but it also yields and comes back to its original shape and will confirm over time with a break in period of about six months to a year if they are under constant tension.
  This material has the ability to be sanded to fit or you can add a shim to tighten them up however over subsequent generations of printing I finally got the right size where in 90% of cases adjustment is not necessary. The installation is easy and requires no hardware and can be removed easily if you don't like them.


Although I could have made a more elaborate set up my goal was to keep costs low and installation simple for the most bang for the buck and volume of sales. That goal was achieved long ago. It is nice to see a new more refined option and I wish them the best of luck.
Hi Dev. Are you still manufacturing these and if so, how much shipped to the UK please?
Gerry

Dev

Quote from: Microgerry on September  1, 2022, 20:14Hi Dev. Are you still manufacturing these and if so, how much shipped to the UK please?
Gerry

I finished a large batch earlier this month. I plan to make another batch in October. Price would be $50 plus $15 shipping to the Uk. Send me a PM in the first week of Oct and I will set you up.

Gibla

#32
So whilst in pre, mid, and post selling of cars + swapping bits around to suit myself I came up with the following conclusions (but not exactly comparing like for like as some Fl + PFL along with different tyre/ suspension combos.)

FL with Devs + JS inserts removed, but still with Carolynne strut brace = inferior to when 'full monty' present  (the black car that has now been sold)

FL with Dev + JS inserts installed but awaiting strut brace = not a detectable difference to 'full monty' (the yellow car that is getting strut brace installed 16/9/22)

So my conclusion from that is that the combined inserts are certainly helping appreciably :- this is both with and without cf roof present or not. This doesn't mean the strut brace is ineffective ...far from it, these unscientific offerings were from the pov of scuttle shake and a feeling of solidity, not from a cornering prowess aspect

As from today though there will be no opportunity to replicate or do further testing as my MR2 # have been culled to 'just' 2 and both are 'full monty' ie with inserts + bracing.
ps
Another 'finding' was if Dev insert only = close to a 'full monty', from memory I had a JS only arrangement that always was in combo with a strut brace = good , but no direct comparisons as many months apart .
The issues I had with the Dev inserts were sorted out with the Carnauba paste that was suggested by the man himself, but one set (no longer in use or in my possession seemed to be vastly thicker and readily would cause opening issues in all weathers)
stock 2001 Dark Green MR-S (6R4)
stock 2004 Black - repurchased from guy who bought yellow 'un
stock 2000 Light Green(Cape Green)

J88TEO

Quote from: Gibla on September 16, 2022, 05:14cause opening issues in all weathers
I had that issue as I don't drive my car much...the small garage in Summer is like an oven and a freezer in Winter!

Petrus

Thanks or reporting @Gibla .

I am véry chuffed with having forked out for the TRD´s to go with Dev´s.  For the rest my car is nicely braced and sorted suspension. The further doubling of the spacing effect, reduction of the measured torsion by half again, is very noticeable on the road.
The back roads are dream twisties but the surface something quite suboptimal. Large tractors with overloaded tailers on supersingle tyres make for jaw dropping cakewalks which are like custom desiged to twist a car chassis. The way it is now, it is as solid as a roofed car.

It is also a delight when playing with the rear traction. The more flex a car has in suspension and/or chassis, the more it is inclined to bite you by slapping the other way when you compensate. The tendency is absent now. I hardly if at all need correct actually as the lsd straightens it out into the direction the front wheels point.

Dev

Quote from: Gibla on September 16, 2022, 05:14So whilst in pre, mid, and post selling of cars + swapping bits around to suit myself I came up with the following conclusions (but not exactly comparing like for like as some Fl + PFL along with different tyre/ suspension combos.)

FL with Devs + JS inserts removed, but still with Carolynne strut brace = inferior to when 'full monty' present  (the black car that has now been sold)

FL with Dev + JS inserts installed but awaiting strut brace = not a detectable difference to 'full monty' (the yellow car that is getting strut brace installed 16/9/22)

So my conclusion from that is that the combined inserts are certainly helping appreciably :- this is both with and without cf roof present or not. This doesn't mean the strut brace is ineffective ...far from it, these unscientific offerings were from the pov of scuttle shake and a feeling of solidity, not from a cornering prowess aspect

As from today though there will be no opportunity to replicate or do further testing as my MR2 # have been culled to 'just' 2 and both are 'full monty' ie with inserts + bracing.
ps
Another 'finding' was if Dev insert only = close to a 'full monty', from memory I had a JS only arrangement that always was in combo with a strut brace = good , but no direct comparisons as many months apart .
The issues I had with the Dev inserts were sorted out with the Carnauba paste that was suggested by the man himself, but one set (no longer in use or in my possession seemed to be vastly thicker and readily would cause opening issues in all weathers)

Interesting observations. The original offering of my door bushings were thicker and then I revised them based on customer feedback where they had to sand them to fit. The next iteration was better with some that had to sand them. The last version are the Goldilocks versions and the most sold versions with no adjustments needed by the owner.
 The Carnauba past wax works like magic for a long time with many not needing another application as the bushings break in. Some did not heed my advise and used grease instead which did not work well and became messy. Some with the first and second iterations that are tight are now using teflon tape on the other side of the contact point and reporting that it works well.

Gibla

Quote from: Petrus on September 16, 2022, 12:35the more it is inclined to bite you by slapping the other way when you compensate

I have a great acid test nearby, on a fast A-road with a rail level crossing very close to a following sharpish bend.
Any car that hasn't any bracing or inserts shakes violently, and has a noticeable deflection from the intended line, whereas with inserts and bracing no issues whatsoever.
 
stock 2001 Dark Green MR-S (6R4)
stock 2004 Black - repurchased from guy who bought yellow 'un
stock 2000 Light Green(Cape Green)

Petrus

Good comparative test yes.