Handbrake woes

Started by Mr220Mike, December 12, 2022, 16:47

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Mr220Mike

Evening all

It appears that my handbrake has frozen on. There is no resistance in the travel but it won't sit right at the bottom, bouncing back up a bit triggering the light on the dash. The brakes are stuck fast.

Has anyone had this happen to them and can anyone recommend how I can free them?

Carolyn

Find a lump of wood that can fit through the spokes of your wheels, put it up against the caliper, smack the other end with a mallet.

I suspect you have water inside the cables and it's frozen solid.  They will be frozen at the lowest point.

If you have a way of getting some kind of heat source under the car, you could thaw them out.
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Mr220Mike

Thanks Carolyn. I did think about that but the only thing I have would be my other half a hair dryer and thought once one side was done the heat would have dissipated.

I'll try the wood and hammer option too. I was going to try but didn't want to do any damage.

I'll report back.

Gaz mr-s

Same topic on a facebook group.  Likely cause of the handbrake frozen is moisture down the rear end of the cables, caused by the rubbers on the end being perished or disintegrated.
These can be trimmed & made to fit. https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/112103512193?hash=item1a19e3d881:g:SnkAAMXQUmFSphV6&amdata=enc%3AAQAHAAAAoJNqhbbwtQm%2FzALB9%2FggulTeheNXHvwrV9tXlvqabtVb9UBuZ8UQfBPlvqyIUuX6TOkYo%2BuDAtaX%2FMWGe%2F74CqhGzBIuM5Hq%2FRwH5qUwV7cfJ2XgcbFSsgnv7YolA9OBZlvXnWt1uE8%2BSFEo6sWAWP6pNGtMc8NrY8sI%2Fr1PIKJCsI7DvIC4tDvs2SUehftWzUaJO%2BTtJ3RN3k3eXu9zh%2Bk%3D%7Ctkp%3ABk9SR_LQg_SgYQ

If you can avoid leaving it parked with handbrake on, just leave it in gear.  Commonly done with them.  A Breaker once cut a cable up & found grit 15" from the end. The chances are your cables have been sticky. 
Lift the console, undo the tension, seperate each cable from the bracket, & devise a way of holding the cable ends vertical.
Undo the cables off the caliper, including the cranked bracket, & further forward undo the support bracket, to allow the end of the cable down to the ground.  You can try squirting WD40 or similar in from the rear, but also the front, & work the cable back & forth.  Some 3in1 oil after is thought to be sensible. Don't use grease.

Mr220Mike

Thanks all. Went with the wood and hammer technique and it seems to have released. All being well it will be alright. Handbrake cables will be required for next MOT anyway so not an issue having them replaced early.

Thanks again.

cyclehead

As above, inspect the tiny rubber gaiters.   Once they tear and any water enters, the steel cable housing will begin to rust.  I've had good success (so far) with preventive measures.   Slice open the heavy rubber cable housing and soak with moisture displacing oil.   https://www.spyderchat.com/threads/parking-brake-cable-preventive-maintenance.157480/post-2152655
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Joesson

The Spyderchat comment is dated 2021, although the writer joined in 2011, either way the condition of the under side of his 2 is Very clear of corrosion. I bought my 2002 car in 2011 and it had way more corrosion then  than that shown in the thread. One of my early jobs was to remove, de rust and paint the ARB's.
So, even stranger that there is water in the cable sheaving.
Earlier this year the rubber gaiters on my car were still in good condition, 20 years of age, first 9 parked outside in London, the past 11 garaged in Warwickshire. I don't drive my car ( enough) but never n the rain unless I'm caught out or travelling to a very wet Ding Day a few years back.
So, I am puzzled as to why there are obviously problems with this part of our car in genera.
The Spyderman's car in 2011 , or perhaps more recently is rust free but has water in the brake cables. Mine, 20 years old, "typical" corrosion but no water!

Gaz mr-s

Quote from: Joesson on December 13, 2022, 10:24Earlier this year the rubber gaiters on my car were still in good condition, 20 years of age,

Lucky man. Or have you treated the rubbers with a preserver?
I've fitted the MGF rubbers to 3 cars.  I've no proof of this, but I suspect cable failure will be almost always down to the rubbers failing. 

Any Roadster not owned by a hands-on owner who knows to look for this issue will need the cables replaced. 
Then the problems of poor aftermarket cables start.

Joesson

#8
Quote from: Gaz mr-s on December 13, 2022, 11:49Lucky man. Or have you treated the rubbers with a preserver?
I've fitted the MGF rubbers to 3 cars.  I've no proof of this, but I suspect cable failure will be almost always down to the rubbers failing. 

Any Roadster not owned by a hands-on owner who knows to look for this issue will need the cables replaced. 
Then the problems of poor aftermarket cables start.

No special treatment on my part.
I confess that my attention to the brakes prior this year was only to change the fluid at no more than 2 year intervals, and I do a very low mileage, and check the pad wear.
I do advocate a good pump on the foot pedal at regular intervals to reposition the pistons.
That worked for me until it didn't, and I had a sticking caliper advisory on my last advisory and hence my extensive refurb mentioned elsewhere.

PS
I did lubricate the outer end of the cables/ the inside of the OE cable gaiters with silicone grease as used elsewhere on the brakes during the refurb.